Construction Law Terms: A to Z

K is for Key Dates

Huw Wilkins considers how the Key Dates mechanism found in NEC contracts differs from the more commonly known ‘sectional completion’ mechanism and looks at issues to consider when Key Dates are used.

J is for Joint Venture

Huw Wilkins considers the use of joint ventures in construction projects and issues for parties to consider when entering into a joint venture.

I is for Indemnity

Huw Wilkins considers what makes an indemnity different to a term of a contract and addresses some of the issues parties should consider when drafting indemnities.

H is for the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996

Huw Wilkins considers how the courts deal with Construction Contracts that do not meet the requirements in the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996 in respect of (i) payment provisions and (ii) adjudication provisions.

G is for Global Claims

Huw Wilkins considers how the court’s approach to global claims has evolved in recent years and the requirements a contractor will need to meet in order to succeed in bringing a global claim.

F is for Frustration

Huw Wilkins considers the legal doctrine of frustration including when it might arise on a construction project and, where it does arise, what consequences follow.